Flower Painting: Spring Process Art

We decided to take our art into the outdoors this week, with a fun, inexpensive, easy process art activity. We ditched the paintbrush in favor of bright sunny (and extraordinarily available) dandelions. There really are no directions for this activity, just free exploration of the materials for your child.

Little M. had fun making large sweeping motions across the page with her flowers as well as jabbing the paper to make dots.  The activity even prompted her to try and search the backyard for more impromptu paintbrushes.

(You may also be interested in our observation of broccoli flowers.)

Painting with Flowers: Process Art



Here's What You Will Need for This Process Art Activity:

  • flowers
  • clothespins (optional)
  • non-toxic washable paint
  • paper
  • something to use for a painting pallet

Painting with Flowers


Pack up your art supplies and head outside for this activity. Pick some flowers with your child in the backyard. Once you and your child feel you have enough flowers, find a comfortable place to begin painting.

Preschooler beginning to paint with flowers


Looking for a math activity using flowers? Check out our flower measurement activity.

Pour a small amount of paint onto your pallet (we actually forgot to bring something out to use as a pallet, so we just used another piece of paper). Let your child freely explore the materials. They can paint with the flower or the stem. At one point Little M. decided to forage for some grass and paint with that!

Child making process art with wildflowers


Need a book to go with this activity? Check out our roundup of children's books about flowers.

If your child picks very short flowers, it may be helpful to use some clothespins to create a handle for the “paintbrush.” It might also be a good idea to use them if you know that your child does not like the sensory experience of touching paint (the clothespin will create a buffer).

Looking for more process art activities? Check out Smelly Paint, Painting with Bells, Marker Painting, and Butterfly Symmetry Painting

Thank you for reading about our wildflower process art activity. If you enjoyed this activity or found it useful, leave us a comment down below or share on social media. We'd love to hear from you!

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